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olivejuicemusic

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Reply with quote  #1 
Interesting article here. My jet lagged 5am thoughts on the matter for now are if you want to be valued in a world of commerce then you have to be able to prove that value in some way. And yes sometimes it comes down to counting heads in a bar. Everyone is looking for a deal or a free lunch or at least a free cup of coffee. If your recorded music is that free cup of coffee that gets someone into your reastaurant or live show to spend more money then so be it. But once you make that coffe free it's gonna be difficult to get someone to pay for it again unless it's in a very shiney new cup. And there's also a whole other world of levels of this when it comes to the live show thing that I'm in no condition to even get into right now. http://blog.discmakers.com/2013/11/pay-everyone-but-the-musician/
Barry N. Bliss

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Reply with quote  #2 
It's simple, in my eyes.

  Give your music away to whoever you are inspired to give it to, but never give it away because you believe you may get something in return.
 (If you need something in return, charge for it, or set up a trade agreement.)


 This whole "exposure" thing has always been, is, and always will be a lie and a scam.

olivejuicemusic

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Reply with quote  #3 
16 Artists That Are Now Speaking Out Against Streaming… Monday, December 2, 2013 by Paul Resnikoff http://www.digitalmusicnews.com/permalink/2013/12/02/artistspiracy ------- Just a little vent, listening to these successful artists, who have benefited greatly from the system complain about having to do things for themselves is sort of frustrating. I'm skeptical at the prospects of any of them actually being in danger of not being able to support themselves. But no doubt the new music business paradigm is clearly not working for them the way they would like. Financial limitations have governed my entire artistic career, not necessarily in a bad way. That being said I like the fact that they are speaking out and bringing awareness to this issue. I respect their work and their opinions greatly. At this point, personally, I don't have the means to accurately assess how the streaming thing hurts or helps me.
Barry N. Bliss

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Reply with quote  #4 
...listening to these successful artists, who have benefited greatly from the system complain about having to do things for themselves is sort of frustrating.

They have not benefitted greatly from the system so much as they have benefitted greatly from a system.
The system they benefitted greatly from is being replaced by a system they are not benefitting greatly from.

 Not everyone is good at everything, so why should they have to do it all for themselves?
 If most of them do it all for themselves, it won't get done as well overall.
 Also, what do all the great mixers and engineers and graphic artists do for a living if the artists have to mix, engineer, and draw their own artwork?

Financial limitations have governed my entire artistic career...

 Not because people sold your music and kept most of the money though.

I don't have the means to accurately assess how the streaming thing hurts or helps me.

 Unless someone put my songs on Spotify, I am not on there.
 I am on bandcamp (only my latest release).
 Total Plays---526
 Total Sales---5
Your mom could probably put out an album and double my sales with no problem.

 Pretty much nothing hurts or helps me because pretty much no one is listening anyway.

 I basically agree with the artists in the article, though.
olivejuicemusic

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- They have not benefitted greatly from the system so much as they have benefitted greatly from a system.
The system they benefitted greatly from is being replaced by a system they are not benefitting greatly from.

Yeah, that's what I meant by this: "...no doubt the new music business paradigm is clearly not working for them the way they would like."

- Not everyone is good at everything, so why should they have to do it all for themselves?

Agreed. Not saying they do. But knowledge is power. And like the saying goes. You record a man: he plays for a day. You teach him to record: he plays for a lifetime.

- If most of them do it all for themselves, it won't get done as well overall.

Probably. But I'm in a situation where it won't get done period. I feel like it's kind of like a Chef arguing about access to the best ingredients while I'm just trying to get food on the table. I could sit around and bitch about it. I could spend my days convincing someone with deep pockets to fund my project or license my music. I could join an anti streaming group and try to support some kind of law against that. Or I could just figure out a way to do things myself or cheaper. My answer is to do a little bit of all these things. Also I think all that stuff is very relative. Nan just booked a 1 month European tour for us and we had a professional booker tell us, point blank, that he couldn't have done a better job. Would we have liked to use the time she spent booking working on practicing our new songs instead. HELL YES!!!

- Also, what do all the great mixers and engineers and graphic artists do for a living if the artists have to mix, engineer, and draw their own artwork?

The more I learn about all these processes the more I learn to really appreciate talent in all of these departments and, honestly, the less I really want to do them myself. But if I had a pot of money dropped in front of me to make my first album I probably would have taken it all for granted. And then when it wasn't there I wouldn't know what to do.

- ...Not because people sold your music and kept most of the money though.

That's not really what's happening here. No one is selling music. Well record lablels are but the artists are getting paid for that. Websites are selling advertising that goes along with music that is being streamed on websites. No one is, really, selling my because I haven't sold the rights to it, out side of the cut that Bandcamp takes.
------------

I don't see this as an either/or kind of thing. And I'm not by any means taking a position in defense of streaming. If indeed streaming is hurting my musical career then I'm glad these people are speaking out. But like I said, at this point, I have no idea if it is or it isn't. I never made tons of money from my music. And to be honest, I just feel like I can't relate to something being taken away that was never there. All I know is I do a little better every year. I feel like Beck arguing that streaming is killing his music because he can't afford to hire the best studio musicians and mastering engineer to make his record anymore is not a totally fair assessment of the situation. Ironically my favorite record of Beck's was probably the cheapest one he ever made on K (One Foot In The Grave). On the other hand I don't blame anyone for spending money on these things if they feel like they need them. We recorded vocals through a 15 thousand dollar microphone on our last album and I thought it was totally worth it. I think good music will usually find a way...or it won't. If somehow you feel like the project that you're working on requires a great deal of money then you'll find a way to get it. And if you can't find a way and you're still passionate about it then you'll find a way to do it cheaper. At this point I just don't have a big enough horse in the game.


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