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olivejuicemusic

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Reply with quote  #1 
The age old question of a art and commerce. Nice to hear someone as respected as Picasso address it so succinctly. Anyone read this whole book? Looks pretty interesting.

http://www.brainpickings.org/index.php/2014/05/05/brassai-conversations-with-picasso-success-compromising/
B

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Reply with quote  #2 
My understanding was that Picasso purposefully compromised (if that is a correct use of the word) his vision in order to make money as well as art by doing the art and then adding an eye or a nose so that the public would have something to lach onto.
 This may not be true, or it may be.

 I disagree that all important artists can earn a living at it in their lifetime.
 Van Gogh certainly gave it a shot.

 Speaking for myself, whether you (anyone) believes I am a great singer-songwriter or not, I identified it decades ago as my greatest talent, and many times quit jobs and again devoted myself 100% only to the music, only to fail each time at having figured out how to earn a living at it.
olivejuicemusic

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Reply with quote  #3 
This quote rang true to me personally in light of the changes I've made in my life the past couple of years.

“One must have the courage of one’s vocation and the courage to make a living from one’s vocation.”

It's hard for me to explain why exactly. For most of my life I had been creating art and thinking that in the back of my head it was what I wanted to do for a living. But I wasn't really doing that. Sure, I was finding ways to occasionally get paid from my art. But I was still looking outside of my art for my living. It was not so much because I didn't want to compromise my art but because I didn't want to compromise my life style or my ideals about what I think art was. I wouldn't call it lazy. I was was working my ass off. I was just looking at it differently.

I never fully committed to the idea that my art was my vocation and that it was what I wanted to make my living from. Now I wake up everyday and I think about that. I think about how my art is my vocation. It doesn't make it any less special or amazing. In fact it makes it more amazing.

Let me put it this way. If I have a job washing dishes or something I can't help get really good at it. Like, I get to the point to where I don't even have to think about it. I'm like a machine that just keeps getting better and better at washing dishes. I become more efficient. It eventually take less mental and physical effort. Dish washing is my vocation and as as a by product I become a kick ass dish washer.

Now I try to treat doing music that way. I work on it every day in whatever I do. It's not always just the creative process of writing or performing. Sometimes it's just about studying another artist or reading or meditating or booking a show or tweeting or yes finding a new revenue stream for my work but it's all part of my chosen vocation as an artist.

B

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Reply with quote  #4 
My thought is that some artists will never, no matter what they do, earn money from their art.
 Money may enter the picture after they are gone, but they themselves will never see it.
 Society, in general, values dishwashers way more than singers that sing songs about the void.

 Some will see tons of money, some will see some money, and some will see none.
olivejuicemusic

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Reply with quote  #5 
"Society, in general, values dishwashers way more than singers that sing songs about the void."

Aside from seeing this statement as incorrect, I don't see why we have to "value" one over the other.

As the old saying goes: Value is in the eye of the beholder (or in this case ear).

If relatively few people are ever even exposed to your work then how can you assess your value, in general, on society?

B

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Reply with quote  #6 
"Society, in general, values dishwashers way more than singers that sing songs about the void."

Aside from seeing this statement as incorrect, I don't see why we have to "value" one over the other.

 My thought is that society does value one, and does not value the other.
I'll stick by that.


As the old saying goes: Value is in the eye of the beholder (or in this case ear).

 The majority of beholders have made their preferences clear time and time again, and I don't simply mean in my case.


If relatively few people are ever even exposed to your work then how can you assess your value, in general, on society?

Intuition. Experience.
My statement wasn't simply about me. It was a general observation.
Regarding me though, I doubt that if everyone on Earth was tied down and played my music that all of a sudden I'd be a popular performer.
I did not keep my music a secret. I put it out there in numerous forms and many people that did find and hear it were not impressed. This is no boo hoo me statement. Again, it's an observation.
So far, I am totally fine with the way things have gone.
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 Let me just say I have no interest in arguing and that I consider you to be a nice man engaging in what the Buddhists refer to as right livelihood.
 You and your partner are the real deal, and the life y'all live is one that I am sure inspires many others.
 My take on you and I is that we have semantical differences and detail/surface differences as well, but I sense no fundamental difference myself, and I certainly see you as a comrade and a friend, and not as an enemy or someone out to hurt me.
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